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find that hamas has now -- has hosted leaders from turkey, from egypt, qatar, foreign ministers from a variety of arab countries. it gained quite a lot in the last eight days, and some people here would say it would be foolhardy for them to lose their gains, simply because some small faction decides to launch a rocket over the border. >> and you're looking at a live picture on the right-hand side of your screen of gaza city. keep that picture up as we continue our discussion to see if there are any more incoming shells from israeli defense forces nerks o forces, any outgoing forces. joined by wolf blitzer here in our studio, in jerusalem. you just spoke to mark reghev, the spokesman for the prime minister. you asked him some key questions and for some there were not answers. in particular what happens to the borders, to the blockade of gaza city? >> i think that will depend if this thing holds. if the rockets no longer go into israel, if there is no firing at israeli troops who are patrolling the border, if that stops, i think the israelis are prepared to take some steps to ease some
, just got him. and, it's not how a democratic government is supposed to act. fresh outrage, after egypt's president makes a near absolute power grab in a country with great influence in the middle east peace process and an american partner and high stakes diplomacy. ♪ >> harris: returning to the same place that gave birth to the country's revolution less than two years ago, this sends president mohamed morsi a message, what freedom fighters say must happen to stop a new cycle of violence in the streets. fox reports live from cairo. also, destruction, more than 40 buildings taking a hit, in an explosion, some leveled, new tonight, neighbors bringing us inside the horror with stories you will never forget. >> you were startled and then heard screaming and everyone in the buildings are screaming. >> windows are shattered and the window frame is down on the floor. >> harris: the search for answers intensifying as we learn more about split-second decisions that saved lives. >>> and his character left hundreds of millions of viewers asking, who shot jr. remembering larry hagman, the man who
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
-fire. netanyahu said israel is prepared to take whatever action is necessary to defend itself. and egypt, which is brokering a deal between the two sides, cancelled a press conference where officials were expected to announce a deal with terms for a cease-fire. tomorrow, secretary clinton meets with the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas and then will fly to egypt to speak with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a buildi
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
, president obama, has called and talked to the president of egypt, morsi, three times now in the last 24 hours. really trying to put a u.s. stamp, footprint, if you will, on the negotiations. how much leverage does the u.s. have in actually making sure that the cease-fire is something that's going to hold? >> well the u.s. doesn't have much leverage over hamas because the u.s. doesn't deal with hamas. the u.s. government, previous governments, regards hamas as a terrorist organization. when secretary of state hillary clinton visits here in jerusalem later, then goes to ramallah to meet with mahmoud abbas tomorrow and then goes to cairo she's not going to meet with anyone from hamas. the u.s. does have leverage on egypt, given the economic and military assistance the u.s. provides to egypt and given the dire economic straits that the egyptians are in right now. so the u.s. has leverage on the egyptians and obviously the u.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hill
're getting these rockets through the tunnels in the southern border with egypt. some of them is more than one stage. it's a long rocket. it has to be disassembled and brought in. and this has increased the range of the rockets fired by hamas and the other resistance organizations as far as jerusalem and tel aviv. and that has real significant change. really the most significant change we've seen in the conflict between hamas and israel for quite some time. >> reporter: you and i were also on the scene about four or five blocks from here earlier in the day when three israeli missiles hit the second floor of the media center. explain what happened there earlier. >> reporter: that was about 3:20 in the afternoon, and we saw three rockets hit the building. one hit the front. we saw a great big ball of flame coming out. very quickly, a large crowd of journalists, of course, and first responders, the fire department, the ambulances showed up. they did bring out a man on a stretcher. his body was completely charred. he appeared lifeless. >> reporter: his clothes had been burned off. >> reporter: com
morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it comes to mediating the deals between the two sides israel has always played a critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the east, is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity here in gaza. and that changed the dynamics and it has changed the way we have been seeing things the way they played out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical test. >> arwa damon, thank you very much. welcome to you. >> thanks for having me. >> can you outline
's going on with egypt, the united states annually gives roughly $2 billion to egypt and something that senator graham made clear over the weekend is to remind egypt everyone is watching their steps. >> egypt, watch what you do and how you do it. you're teetering with the congress on having your aid cut off if you keep inciting violence between the israelis and the palestinians. >> so is this a big test for morsi to prove not only that they are a partner to the united states, but an ally moving forward? >> well, they have been a treaty ally since '79. there's roughly $2 billion in aid given to egypt every year. $2 billion isn't quite what it used to be. so if this is the one piece of leverage that we have over egypt, that's not going to work. what we -- >> even in an economy that's totally failing and upside down for egypt, it's -- $2 billion is not an incentive to want to play nice? >> i don't think that it is the only factor that will get mohamed morsi to be an honest broker in the region. i think it's much -- it would be a much better bet to appeal to his sense of wanting to be
, and to the middle east now, that truce between israel and hamas holding. but now, a brewing crisis in egypt. giant protests because of their new leader and what he's done. president mohamed morsi, seen here with secretary of state hillary clinton, helping to broker that truce, but right after, a push from morsi for more power. many of the people of egypt said not so fast, and the protests are growing now. abc's matt gutman in the region again tonight for us. >> reporter: with massive protests, a cloud of tier gas, egypt is again in turmoil tonight. the violence, a reaction to egypt's first democratically elected leader, mohamed morsi, declaring all his presidential decisions are exempt from appeal or review by law makers or the courts. protesters torching a muslim brother office in alexandria and mohamed elle bar are detweeting, he appointed himself egypt's new f farrow. >> just months ago, morsi was obscure before being elected in may, shooting to international prominence this week by brokers the hamas/israel cease-fire. solidifying himself as a key u.s. al li. >> i want to thank president morsi
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
egypt's president, trying to broker a truce. minutes ago he declared that israel will soon halt its air strikes on gaza. along egypt's border with gaza, reza sayeh. tell us more. >> reporter: we don't want to jump to conclusions. we should be very cautious. there are growing signs from where we are standing in egypt that there could a closing in on a truce or cease fire. latest sign is a statement made by egyptian president mohamed morsi, according to state tv. he said that, quote, israeli gra aggression would end on tuesday. that, of course, is today. that's consistent with similar statements we've heard from other officials late last night. we spoke with a senior egyptian official and he told us he's optimistic that in the next 24 hours there would be a cease fire. hamas officials are being even more specific. senior hamas official telling cnn that israel has agreed to the general terms but rejected the timing. hamas conditions, according to an official, are this. stop the air operation, air assaults and want the ground crossings, blockades to be opened up immediately. according to th
to hear, egypt's president mohamed morsi suggesting progress in attempts at brokering a cease-fire. and backing hamas, released a statement saying, the travesty of the israel aggression on gaza will end in a few hours. we're going to get to the details of all of this and the apparent pause in fighting in just a moment. but first, we want to look at the united states role and all the various players that are involved in this. and in about an hour, secretary of state hillary clinton is to meet with israel prime minister benjamin netanyahu. tomorrow, she is scheduled to meet with the palestinian authority. mahmoud abbas. he's in the west bank. that's on the opposite side of israel from gaza. he's going to be talking -- talking to the palestinian authority, it is a way really to communicate with hamas. now, clinton cannot speak with hamas directly because the united states considers it a terrorist group. so by talking to palestinians she can reach hamas. talking to egypt's president is going to be her last stop. as we see here. so by talking to egypt, that's another way for her to
president of egypt, mohamed morsi. the question now, is will it hold? will the people of the region get some peace? we have more on both sides of the conflict. we get more from our chief correspondent andrea mitchell, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, kate, the cease-fire was brokered under pressure from president obama, but wouldn't have happened without egypt's new islamic president, mohamed morsi, playing a key role. the cease-fire came after another night of punishing air strikes against gaza. and the first bus bombing in tel aviv in eight years. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza, the rocket attacks must end to bring a broader, calm return. >> reporter: the agreement calls for israel to stop air strikes and hamas to stop rocket attacks. if that holds for 24 hours, they will talk about border contrs on gaza, and promise no more targeting of hamas leaders. israeli ground troops are mobilized, if there are attacks >> now, i realize that there are citizens who expect a harder military action, and we may very well need to do that. but at the pre
room" starts now. >>> happening now, police fire tear gas as demonstrations in egypt turn violent. angry protesters accuse egypt's president of betraying the revolution. and in the word of one critic, making himself a pharoah. what happened before and after u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s. did in the moments before killing osama bin laden. >>> wolf blitzer's off today. i'm joe johns. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's astonishing show of fury in egypt. within the past hour egyptian authorities tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
by the united states and instead they find egypt, turkey, other countries of the region, are playing a much more proactive role in the crisis. >> hillary clinton will be meeting with mahmoud abbas, with the palestinian authority, with fatah in the west bank. a lot of observers say that's a face-saving move to help him out. sort of been sidelined in all of this, who comes out in the group stronger? does hamas emerge stronger no matter what happens? what does that mean moving forward for u.s. relations with pat stillian groups? the u.s. doesn't recognize hamas. been trying to deal with the palestinian authority. but if they have lost power, what does that mean moving forward to getting a longer term peace deal? >> to be honest, i don't think either palestinian faction comes out ahead the palestinian people have known six decades of futility. never been able to formulate what they need to do with their own lives. never have diplomatic answers. so i think now the hamas people will have their moment in the sun. there will be people that will come to them. visitors from afar. the turks will come in, a
. in egypt, we've seen huge protests against president mohamed morsi and the new powers he assumed just a day after the truce. he's insisting he's committed to democracy, but opponents are calling him a dictator it could be a complication for the cease-fire between israel and hamas negotiations moving forward. let's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> reporter: joe, the coming weeks here in egypt are going to be fascinating when it comes to politics. that's because there is an intensifying faceoff between egyptian president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in p
are scrambling to try to get israel and hamas to take a step back. egypt's prime minister and president arrived in gaza today. a planned cease-fire for the visit never materialized while president mohamed morsi made it clear whose side egypt is on. >> translator: we support the people of gaza. we are with them in their trenches. what hurts them hurts us. and the blood that flows from their children is our blood too. >> so most of the west, including the united states sides with israel. a nation now on the brink of staging a ground assault. israel's deputy foreign minister told cnn this morning that would trigger that move. >> if we will see in the next 24, 36 hours more rockets, launched at us, i think that would be the trigger. >> ben wedeman joins me now from the israel/gaza border. what are you seeing and hearing there now? >> reporter: it is a bit surreal here. we're in the city's marina right next to the yoko sushi restaurant. as you can see, there are people out, having dinner. seemingly to be living a normal life. but the owner of this restaurant did tell us just an hour ago they heard t
but it's the implication of the arab spring and today egypt is ruled not by president mubarak, whose regime shared israel's concern and adversity to hamas but by the muslim brotherhood that treats hamas as its podigy, its kind of protectorate in gaza. and qatar -- in a similar fashion qatar is becoming more and more the financial backer of hamas in gaza. so you can argue that the good news is that hamas is further away from iran and from syria. the more radical governments in the region. closer to egypt and qatar who are less radical, re western oriented, more pro-american and with open channels to israel. >> rose: so what do you think is going to happen? >> i think a new cease-fire will be put in place. i hope it will happen within the next 24 hours to prevent and avoid and do without the ground invasion with its deadly cast and then whoever takes t place of jbarras the new leader of hamas will have to impose a cease-fire. while at the same time israel will have to let go some of its blockade of gaza. and i think both sides will try the best face-saving formulas which they can deplo
, to come before cameras in egypt and announce a period of calm. but that announcement has not happened. instead, the office of the e jimgs president, mohamed morsi, told cnn the egyptian government has no plans to make an announcement tonight. since wednesday of last week militants have fired hundreds of rockets into israel. we're about to bring you one family's harrowing story of dodging the rocket that hit their home today. random attacks like this provoke ferocious air assaults on gaza by the israelis, which also continued today. [ gunfire ] about two hours ago a reuters camera in gaza city caught this explosion. cnn's ben wedeman reports a building near the city was likely hit by an israeli air strike in gaza. he was on live with hala gorani when the explosion happened. take a look. >> i think it's pretty clear that we are moving in the direction of -- [ gunfire ] i can hear shattering glass out there right now. the building just shook of course because i was looking at the camera i didn't see where the blast took place. anybody see it? okay. to the north of this building here. so
're watching. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "cnn saturday morning." egypt on edge. thousands of furious protesters pack tahrir square after their new president makes a bold move for unprecedented power. so far, so good, that cease fire between israel and hamas is holding for now. but there are real fears even the slightest flare-up could kick off chaos. >>> how was i to know he would do a dumb thing like that? >> and tv's original bad boy. hollywood reacting this morning to the death of "dallas" star larry hagman. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 a.m. on the west, and here's where we start this morning. larry hagman's family says he was surrounded by family at the end. the 81-year-old actor died of complications from cancer. he's best known for his iconic portrayal of j.r. ewing in the show "dallas." it's a role that he always called his favorite. peter fonda said goodbye to his friend on twitter, saying hagman brought so much fun to everyone's life. cnn entertainment corresponde m correspondent careen winter joins us.
. >>> and now to egypt. demonstrators there have taken to the streets in cairo to protest against president mohamed morsi. morsi expanded his powers this week, and that means no one can challenge his decisions. they can't be overturned. that's led to anger among the people and some of the judges. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. >> reporter: thanks have calmed down considerably in cairo's tahrir square. still demonstrators out in tahrir, especially those who pitched tents overnight but the numbers not as what we saw on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express wha
to be with you. i'm terrell brown. we begin in egypt. president mohamed morsi is scheduled to meet with senior judges today to discuss his move to assume absolute authority. morsi's power grab has triggered three days of violent protests, injuring hundreds. yesterday the egyptian stock market was down more than 9.5%. some u.s. lawmakers are urging caution in dealing with egypt's new islamic leader. >> we don't obviously want to see a democratically elected autocrat take the place of an undemocratically elected dictator. which was the case before that. >> holly williams is in cairo this morning. what's the latest there now? >> reporter: good morning, terrell. here in egypt we saw a lot more violence yesterday. in cairo, protesters who were angry with president morsi fought running street battles with the police. protesters throwing rocks, police firing back with tear gas. one person was killed when a crowd attacked the headquarters of the muslim brotherhood, the islamist group from which the president draws much of his support. beyond the violence you get the sense the president's opponents don
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
the 35-day deadline passes. and congress gets back to work this morning. plus a power grab in egypt. mohamed morsi under fire for granting himself extraordinary powers. will that affect cease-fire talks between israel and hamas? they're happening in egypt today. >> and $59 billion! retail records broken as americans crowded stores for some competitive shopping over the weekend. and now cyber monday is here. will shoppers be in even more of a spending mood? >> you want to talk about money? a new powerball jackpot. a new record in the cash payout. it's unreal. >> a packed two hours ahead for you this morning. new jersey congressman bill pascrell will be joining us, grover norquist, jamie rubin, dr. hanan ashrawi, will be our guest, peter billingsley from a christmas story, and grinle college hoops star jack taylor. remember him? big game he had the other day. and the one and only tony bennett, monday, november 26th. welcome, everybody, "starting point" this morning. is that a hint of compromise in the air on capitol hill? 35 days left till we reach the fiscal cliff. and a couple of ke
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
. and if the diplomats, i know that ban ki-moon, the u.s. secretary general is on his way to egypt and israel. he's trying to get something going. i know representatives from all these other countries that have relations with hamas like e kwijipt and qatar and turkey, they're trying to get something going. there's intense efforts behind the scenes. i don't know if they're going to result in anything. i was asked yesterday what i thought the chances of a serious-fire were. i thought yesterday about 50/50. i haven't been able to talk with anybody in a position of authority here in israel. i've been here in the southern part along the border not far from the -- from gaza. but it doesn't look very promising. let's see if the diplomats can get something going. you point out that the feelings on both sides seem to be intensifying in a bad way. and i think that's right. >> senator john mccain came out and said, you know, we should send bill clinton in. he should be the mediator in this latest conflict. would israel or gaza welcome bill clinton? >> reporter: i've been saying that, actually, myself. i wro
to "early start." today a very important day in the middle east. particularly in egypt. delegations from both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement
hillary clinton is in cairo this morning working to make that peace happen. can egypt help bring an end to the fighting? and back at home, all eyes on the white house for a thanksgiving tradition. the presidential turkey pardon. get ready to gobble up the history of this bird watch. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, november 21st, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert filling in for the great chuck todd. a commuter bus exploded in central tel aviv injuring at least 19 people steps away from the national defense he headquarters. israeli police confirm that an explosive device detonated but say it was not a suicide attack. the white house is calling the attack against israeli civilians outrage o outrageous. the united kingdom is condemning the, quote, shocking violence. the eight-day conflict between israel and hamas has claimed the lives of more than 130 palestinians and five israelis. despite hopes of a ceasefire, tuesday ended as the conflict's deadliest day. secretary clinton who rushed to the region to try to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo
that they will continue to play that role. the bigger problem is that this occupation is not egypt's fault. it is israel's fault. and it's unreasonable to expect egypt or turkey or any other country to put pressure on palestinians. what should be done instead is quite the opposite. the united states is the largest funder of israel. the united states gives $3 billion a year in u.s. taxpayer money to israel in addition to weapons, in addition to political support. if we're going to be serious about moving forward, the role has to come from the united states, pressure from the united states. it's not enough to demand that it come from egypt. >> diana buttu, many thanks for your time. we appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >>> back in the u.s., get ou of the way because black friday is here. people spend long hours in line to score major deals this morning. >> it's affordable right now even if you have to be out here for two days to get it. >> it saves a lot of money like a few hundred dollars. >> cnbc's courtney reagan is in dayton, ohio. how is it going so far out there? >> reporter: you know, so far it looks
as egypt's president expands his power on the heels of helping to broker a ceasefire between israel and hamas. >>> new egyptian leader, same old story for the u.s. relationship? good morning from washington. it's monday, november 26, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. welcome back from the long break. let's get right to my first reads of the morning. congressional leaders return to washington this week and with just 36 days left to avert the so-called fiscal cliff becoming more apparent that senate republicans want a deal and they would like one pretty quick. but while there may be a bi-p t bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stalled. not fully stalled but they didn't go so great last week and it's unclear where speaker boehner will get the votes for a deal that would raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxe
clinton heading into the region at this hour. she's going to be meting with leaders in israel, in egypt, in ramallah, that's going to start tomorrow. the israelis carrying out more than 80 air strikes overnight. 95 rockets back across the border. 38 palestinians killed in the last 24 hours. cnn has the conflict covered from all sides. christiane amanpour is live in jerusalem, arwa damon is on the ground in gaza city, richard plight again is in ashkelon in israel, jessica yellin is live in cambodia where secretary clinton has departed heading for the middle east. we begin with christiane. welcome. give us a sense of this new announcement from israel. how long do you think israel is waiting to silt on this halt before it would move forward with sending ground troops in? >> well, what was reported was that a senior government official in the loop close to the talks has confirmed to me this morning that after the latest intense round of conversations and meetings between prime minister netanyahu and his inner security cabinet, which went on into the early morning hours here jerusalem time,
defending their civilian population. the issue would be whether the, the arabs and president mursi in egypt can appoint some sort of horizon for the people of gaza that would allow them to kind of climb down, this is about humanitarian quarters. the people -- government and hamas government in gaza is feeling a little bit more emboldened because of these sort of these visits by these high level delegations from places like qatar and turkey and of course egypt. so, this is about pointing the queue to a future where there's a political process in place, and i think secretary clinton's going to be looking very hard at how do you talk about what happens after this? because the only way people are going to stop, again, if they can stop, there are a lot of people in gaza with rockets and there's going to have to be a real concerted effort to, you know, weed those out, but also to create a political horizon. >> ambassador stuart holliday joining us this morning. thank you, sir, appreciate your time. >> thank you very much. >> ahead on "starting point" this morning, it's considered a key indicator
for the overall health of the economy. but first, mass protests are erupting in egypt after a sudden power grab. in cairo's tahrir square, thousands are chanting for regime change. they say egypt's new president is acting like a dictator. president mohamed morsi granted himself sweeping new powers yesterday, basically morsi now has absolute power for six months. his opponents say he's acting like a new pharaoh. the u.s. state department is calling for calm and encouraging all parties to work together. morsi declared all his laws, all his decrees are final and cannot be overturned or appealed until egypt's new constitution is put in place. just days ago, people around the world were praising morsi for his pivotal role in negotiating the israel/hamas cease-fire. today, protesters set fire to a symbol of morsi's power, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, egypt. morsi supporters clashed with protesters there. morsi is defending his new powers, saying he's not taking sides and the steps he took are meant to achieve political and social stability. reza sayah joins us live in cairo. rez
. these were things that were going to be discussed. as long as the cease-fire held, egypt being the keeper of the cease-fire, and a senior israeli diplomat told me that they were very glad to see that egypt was filling that role again, mubarak's regime filled the role when he was in power, and they were worried that president morsi was not going to be able to do that because he's more aligned with hamas because he's aligned with the muslim brotherhood. so they're quite happy to see that at least egypt is sort of there, supposed to be the keeper of the peace for the time being. but it is worrying that we're seeing an incident so quickly after the cease-fire was put in place. and a lot of concerns that if this sort of thing starts happening again, there's always incidents along that israel/gaza border that the cease-fire will mean nothing in the next few days. >> sara sidner live for us in jerusalem. as always, thank you. >> i want to bring in stuart holliday the former u.s. ambassador for special political affairs to the united nations. he's currently the president and ceo of the meridian i
krueger. clashes in cairo today, more protests in tahrir square against egypt's president morsi. we'll have a live report. move over george clooney the on yan's kim junge un the sexiest man alive and beijing doesn't get the joke. good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. no joke today on capitol hill. ambassador susan rice's attempt to clear the air with republicans over benghazi did not work as the white house had hoped. senators mccain, ayotte and graham say they have more questions than they had before rice's comments about benghazi. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get it. >> if you don't know what happened just say you don't know what happened. people can push you to give explanations and you can say i don't want to give bad information. >> that's troubling to me as well, why she wouldn't have asked, i'm the person that doesn't know anything about this, i'm going on every single show. >> joining me now for our daily fix, chris cizilla, msnbc contributor managing editor of post politics.com and our own nbc capito
. in egypt, tens of thousands have taken to the streets of cairo last night to protest against the decree by the egyptian president mohamed morsi that grants him sweeping constitutional powers. >> reporter: hundreds of thousands of egyptians have poured into tahrir square and cities all across egypt demanding that president mohamed morsi rescind his decision that granted him sweeping powers. they say it is reminiscent of the mubarak era, sending this country back to dictatorship. for the past five days, police have clashed with protesters, firing tear gas and beating them at times. more importantly, they are demanding that egypt's new constitution is one that reflects the diversity of egypt, not the sole control of the muslim brotherhood. many of the people here are angered by what they say is the attempt by the muslim brotherhood and the president mohamed morsi to take control of the country and ram pole their agenda at the expense of secular forces like those that have gathered behind my. >> neil sheering still with us. investors have gotten quite bullish on egypt. do you think the inve
break out in egypt as police fired teargas into the crowds. here are some of those scenes. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close ele
to the weekend. >>> in egypt protesters are squaring up after they gave them total power over the country. mohamed morsi made the controversial decision and today he plans on meeting with the judicial council. supporters of mohamed morsi are planning big protests tomorrow. >>> the cause of friday's big gas-x motion was human error. -- gas explosion was human error. he was looking for a leak and the explosion was then ignited by a spark. the employee followed sidewalk markings which followed gas markings that were wrong. >> it appears to be an appropriate distance from where old markings were on the sidewalk indicating the gas line from when the main went into the building, however markings were incorrect. >> 21 people were incorrect. now the state department of public utilities discovered that. >>> a many emountain man, richard johnson locked himself inside an apartment after he hit his girlfriend. police say johnson remained hold up with a shotgun for seven hours before he finally surrendered. >>> bryan stow beating case involves a san francisco hospital and more than $1 million and that
across egypt. we'll have the latest on that. then we'll take our annual turn to books. we'll talk about presidents past and present with the legendary bob woodward, whose latest is "the price of politics." historian doris kearns goodwin's "team of rivals" is the basis for the new "lincoln" movie. former "newsweek" editor evan thomas is the author of "ike's bluff." and jon meacham's new book is "thomas jefferson: the art of power." for fun, we'll explore the darker side of fiction with gillian flynn, author of the big bestseller, "gone girl." mystery writer david baldacci, whose new one is forgotten. david baldacci, author of "the expats," and then there is alex stone, whose "fooling houdini" tells how he chose magic over physics, and, yes, he fooled us and he'll fool you, too. how did you do that? we were all about books this morning, just like another washington shopper this weekend. >> we're going to get those. >> okay. >> schieffer: because this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
. >> reporter: what we're seeing here in egypt is a straight on -- 0 show down between mohamed morsi the country's first democratically elected president and his opponent. morsi is showing no signs of backing down from the expanded new powers that he gave himself last week including immunity from the court. judges from these top courts have gone on strike. meanwhile egypt's supreme constitutional court said it will rule on sunday on whether or not to dissolve the assembly that drafted egypt's new constitution. that assembly is dominated by morsi's allies. they are rushing to finish a final draft. on tahrir square in central cairo some opponents are camped out and say they won't leave until he relinquishes his new powers. president morsi supporters are planning a demonstration there on saturday. that could spark violent clashes. holly williams, cbs news, cairo. >> today the united nations is expected to vote to recognize palestine as a sovereign state. the vote to give the palestinians a non-member observer status is opposed by the united states and israel. >> reporter: good morning. that vote wi
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